Aug 09, 2022  
2018-2019 Catalog SVC 
    
2018-2019 Catalog SVC [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 
  
  •  

    ENVAG 231 - Post-Harvest to Local Market Operations

    (3)
    Study local food system development, food physiology, and food security, safety, and quality issues through exposure to real world postharvest and direct market operations, with an emphasis on small farm agriculture enterprises. Field trips are an integral part of this course. None
  
  •  

    ENVAG 241 - Livestock Management

    (1-3)
    The study of how livestock management can be incorporated into a farm plan. Management of various livestock species, demographic management, forage management, as well as manure management. Includes management of diseases and parasites. None
  
  •  

    ENVAG 242 - Dairy Management

    (1-3)
    Focuses on dairy production from several ungulate species and the equipment and hygiene requirements needed. Includes man-hour needs and other cost estimates, and evaluations of value added products like cheeses. None
  
  •  

    ENVAG 243 - Marketing Agriculture Products

    (1-3)
    Focuses on sustainable agriculture niche products. Emphasis is on value added costs and potential revenues, processing, grading, packaging, packing, storing and transport requirements of various farm products. Includes food safety regulations, practices and limitations. None
  
  •  

    ENVAG 270 - Sustainable Small Farming and Ranching

    (5)
    Explore small farm models and entrepreneurship, and conceive of and draft a whole farm management plan. Learn to assess site conditions and user needs and manage small farm facilities and equipment, natural resources, plants and animals, and cropping systems and practices. Field trips are an integral part of this course. None
  
  •  

    ENVAG 271 - Agricultural Entrepreneurship & Business Planning

    (5)
    Explore small farm models and entrepreneurship, and conceive of and draft a whole farm business plan. Gain practical knowledge and skills in agricultural business development, market research, and record keeping and finances in the context of farm and ranch production strategies. Field trips are an integral part of this course. None
  
  •  

    ENVAG 297 - Research in Sustainable Agriculture

    (1-15)
    Independent study and research on a topic related to sustainable agriculture, with guidance provided by a research mentor. An introduction to the scientific method, critical thinking, and technical communication for self motivated learners. Should be taken within the last two quarters of the program. Registration permitted in the first seven weeks as space is available. None
  
  •  

    ENVAG 298 - Practicum in Sustainable Agriculture

    (1-15)
    Hands on practical experience managing a small farm enterprise for aspiring practitioners. Apply weekly on farm education and training to seasonally appropriate operational and production tasks at the SAgE Skagit Valley Student Farm. Should be taken within the last two quarters of the program. Registration permitted in the first seven weeks as space is available. None
  
  •  

    ENVC 101 - Introduction to Watershed Management

    (5)
    Basic geologic processes related to aquatic systems such as rivers, lakes, and wetlands. Measuring and calculating watershed management parameters encouraging quantitative thinking. Includes map interpretation skills. Introduction to Excel and reading figures/tables. Prerequisite: MATH 97 or concurrent enrollment or instructor approval. (Lab and field trips required). Lab and field trips required.
  
  •  

    ENVC 102 - Invertebrate Biology and Identification

    (4)
    Natural history, biology, and taxonomy of common invertebrates including their natural history and biogeographic distribution. None
  
  •  

    ENVC 104 - Introduction to Natural Resources

    (1)
    Introduction to natural resource agencies and institutions, including career opportunities; i.e. the role of the technician in forestry, fisheries, agriculture and parks. Includes student success skills. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment required in CSS 103.
  
  •  

    ENVC 105 - Emergency Incident Management System

    (3)
    Introduction to Incident Management System and emergency operations. Satisfies training requirements for the National Incident Management System and ICS100/200. None
  
  •  

    ENVC 112 - Limnology

    (5)
    Introduction to natural and human-induced processes that shape lake ecosystems. Quantitative and qualitative measuring techniques will be used to assess water quality, including biological integrity. Prerequisite: ENVC 101 or ENVS& 101 or department chair approval. Lab and field trips required. Lab and field trips required.
  
  •  

    ENVC 122 - Stream Ecology

    (5)
    Introduction to physical, chemical and biological components of lotic systems and their anthropogenic impacts. Sampling techniques, lab procedures, water quality and stream habitat will be evaluated. Perform bioassessment. Exploration of global and cultural issues in relation to rivers. Prerequisite: ENVC 112 or department chair approval.
  
  •  

    ENVC 123 - Fish Biology, Taxonomy, and Life History

    (5)
    Classification, biology, physiology, and evolution of representative North American fish. None
  
  •  

    ENVC 130 - Environmental Interpretation

    (5)
    Research presentation and communication styles through oral, visual, and audio-visual means of the history, geology, or natural history of an area, concept or species. Interpretation and discussion of ancient cultural archeological sites and influences on the present. None
  
  •  

    ENVC 133 - Facilities Maintenance Fundamentals

    (5)
    Introduction to facilities maintenance including basic grounds maintenance, electrical, plumbing, and carpentry fundamentals. Includes sediment and erosion control measures for construction sites. None
  
  •  

    ENVC 140 - Plants of Western Washington

    (5)
    Collection, identification, and plant community grouping of local and regional gymnosperms and angiosperms. Identify invasive species. None
  
  •  

    ENVC 165 - Sustainability Fundamentals

    (5)
    Natural Sciences
    Introduction to understanding sustainability principles in human societies. Evaluate how sustainability principles can be applied to urbanization, agriculture and the business world in light of climate change. Solutions will be explored in renewable energy, water resources, transportation, and globalization in the light of environmental economics. None
  
  •  

    ENVC 199 - Cooperative Education

    (1-15)
    Supervised work experience in the field. Includes a weekly seminar. Prerequisite: Instructor permission required.
  
  •  

    ENVC 201 - Watershed Restoration

    (5)
    Techniques and ecological context for restoration and its application in the conservation of biodiversity. Covers state and federal laws pertaining to ecological field work and potential funding sources. Evaluation of social and economic impact of restoration to diverse groups of people. Includes methods in biological engineering. Prerequisite: ENVC 101 with a minimum C grade or department chair approval. Field trips required. Field trips required.
  
  •  

    ENVC 202 - Wildlife Biology: D

    (5)
    Natural Sciences
    Concepts in wildlife management and conservation biology. Understand and identify wildlife management perspectives and constraints in relation to different cultural and social values. Includes relationships between land use patterns and responses by wildlife populations, and wildlife management with climate change challenges. Prerequisite: Reading in technical journals and report writing required.
  
  •  

    ENVC 210 - Fish Ecology and Management

    (5)
    Fish communities and their ecological and physical requirements. Emphasis on population dynamics in relation to habitat changes and fishing pressures. Prerequisite: ENVC 122 and 123. Reading and researching technical journals on current topics of fish conservation and management required. Report writing required. Report writing required.
  
  •  

    ENVC 211 - Ecological Sampling and Monitoring Design

    (4)
    General sampling concepts and population estimation. Methods in ecological sampling of mammals, birds, amphibians, reptiles, fish, and vascular plants. TFW program procedures for stream ambient monitoring. Prerequisite: Field trips required. Strongly recommended: familiarity with computers and spreadsheets. Strongly recommended: familiarity with computers and spreadsheets.
  
  •  

    ENVC 212 - Fluid Flow Laboratory

    (2)
    Focuses on the use of approved methods for collection, testing and reporting of results of samples taken to obtain data for submission to state and federal regulatory agencies. Use of appropriate methods for collection, testing and reporting of results of effluent samples used to control operation of Water and Wastewater Treatment plants. Prerequisite: ENVC 101 and WMATH 100.
  
  •  

    ENVC 220 - Wetlands in Managed Landscapes

    (4)
    General overview of wetland soils, hydrology, and ecology including wetland delineation. Application of basic landscape ecology theory and human impacts on wetlands. Prerequisite: ENVC 101 and 122 or department chair approval. Field trips required. Field trips required.
  
  •  

    ENVC 221 - Ecology of Ecosystem Edges/Ecotones

    (3)
    Importance of ecotones between freshwater systems and upland areas. Essential biological processes shaping ecological properties of ecotones at various scales of time and space. Students must conduct research and give a short seminar. Prerequisite: ENVC 101 and 202 or department chair approval.
  
  •  

    ENVC 222 - Field Project

    (3)
    Field project in cooperation with a landowner starting with a proposal performing an ecological survey and analysis, and ending with a written report based on data collected by the student. Includes research in technical journals, and time estimates. Prerequisite: ENVC 202 and 210 or department chair approval.
  
  •  

    ENVC 225 - Current Issues in Ecology

    (2)
    A current topic of ecology will be examined through guest speakers combined with literature research and seminar presentations. For current & past topics, go to the SVC internet, http://www.skagit.edu/; click on Educational Programs. None
  
  •  

    ENVC 226 - Current Issues in Water Policy

    (2)
    Current topics in U.S. water policies will be examined and evaluated. Water quality standards and the current regulatory environment will be of special interest. None
  
  •  

    ENVC 231 - Introduction to Mammalogy

    (5)
    Natural history, structure, identification, and classification of North American mammals. None
  
  •  

    ENVC 232 - Bird Identification

    (5)
    Natural history, biology, taxonomy, and identification of Pacific Northwest species. None
  
  •  

    ENVC 244 - Salmon Ecology

    (3)
    Ecology of the Pacific Northwest salmon and their importance to social and economic values. None
  
  •  

    ENVC 249 - Introduction to Wastewater Technology

    (5)
    Introduction to the practical aspects of operating and maintaining wastewater treatment plants. Learn to analyze and solve operational problems including mathematical calculations relating to wastewater treatment process control. Covers plant safety, good housekeeping, equipment maintenance, and laboratory procedures. Prerequisite: ENVC 101 and WMATH 100.
  
  •  

    ENVC 250 - Introduction to Water Treatment

    (5)
    Focuses on training water treatment operators in the practical aspects of operating and maintaining water treatment facilities. Includes water sources, reservoir management, infrastructure needs, and water safety. Prerequisite: ENVC 101 and WMATH 100.
  
  •  

    ENVC 302 - Data Management

    (2)
    Development of a data management strategy from field collection, processing, to data storage. Emphasis will be given to the use of tablets and cell phones for field collection to server storage. Prerequisite: Admission to BASEC or Department Chair permission.
  
  •  

    ENVC 304 - River Ecology & Watershed Management

    (5)
    Watershed perspective to learn about rivers and streams with special emphasis on the Pacific Northwest coastal ecoregion. Topics include hydrology, hyporheic flow, geomorphology, stream classification, riparian ecology, and biogeochemical cycles. Development of watershed and ecosystem management at the appropriate spatial and temporal scales including adaptive management processes incorporating cultural values and philosophies allowing successful watershed management. Prerequisite: Admission to BASEC or Department Chair permission.
  
  •  

    ENVC 310 - Soil Ecology

    (5)
    Fundamental principles of soil ecology in relation to physical, nutrient cycling dynamics, biogeochemical cycling, belowground biomass, biodiversity of soil organisms, and soil food webs and ecological processes. Prerequisite: Admission to BASEC or Department Chair permission.
  
  •  

    ENVC 315 - Limnology and Reservoir Ecology

    (5)
    Structure and function of lakes, ponds, and reservoirs. Includes physical, chemical, and biological controls of productivity and species composition of aquatic flora and fauna, and effects of pollution on water quality. Prerequisite: Admission to BASEC or Department Chair permission.
  
  •  

    ENVC 320 - Landscape Ecology

    (5)
    The science and art of studying and influencing the relationships between spatial pattern and ecological processes across different spatio- temporal scales and levels of biological organization. Prerequisite: Admission to BASEC or Department Chair permission.
  
  •  

    ENVC 327 - Advanced Wetland Ecology

    (5)
    Wetland hydrology, biogeochemistry, and biological adaptations to wetland conditions. Including global wetland issues, wetlands and climate change, international management of wetlands, and human interface with wetland in different socio-economic settings. Course includes advanced wetland delineation. Prerequisite: Admission to BASEC or Department Chair permission.
  
  •  

    ENVC 405 - Behavioral Ecology

    (5)
    Investigates the evolutionary and ecological behavioral adaptations of animals. Various taxonomic groups will be examined with an emphasis on vertebrate species as well as species of ecological and economic importance. Ecological behavior will be viewed in light of ecosystem management activities. Prerequisite: Admission to BASEC or Department Chair permission.
  
  •  

    ENVC 407 - Forest Ecology

    (5)
    Forest ecology includes the development of forestry, biogeochemistry, nutrient cycling, transfer and storage of energy, and the physical environment. Forest management as a renewable resource, including fire ecology, forest succession, and functioning of forest ecosystems. Prerequisite: Admission to BASEC or Department Chair permission.
  
  •  

    ENVC 410 - Conservation Biology

    (5)
    Exploring the world’s biological diversity including a wide range of species, complex ecosystems, and the genetic variation within species. Conservation biology is an interdisciplinary science that includes not only biological and ecological solutions, but includes socio-economic aspects. Includes ecological modeling. Prerequisite: Admission to BASEC or Department Chair permission.
  
  •  

    ENVC 412 - Natural Resource Policy Analyses

    (5)
    Course evaluates and analyzes a broad range of contemporary natural resource policies, case studies, and controversies using bioeconomic resource management models. Topics include wildlife and fisheries policies, forestry policies, tropical deforestation, water rights/management policies, endangered species and nature preservation a, and sustainable development. Prerequisite: Admission to BASEC or Department Chair permission.
  
  •  

    ENVC 420 - Estuarine and Nearshore Ecology

    (5)
    Provide an integrated view of the ecological processes in estuaries and nearshore environments. Special emphasis will be on the Salish Sea and the Pacific Northwest coastal environments. Prerequisite: Admission to BASEC or Department Chair permission.
  
  •  

    ENVC 422 - Culminating Project

    (5)
    Carry out a field project including all aspects of documentation. Includes initial proposal, peer review processes, data collection and analysis, secondary research, time estimates, and report writing. Prerequisite: Admission to BASEC or Department Chair permission.
  
  •  

    ENVC 424 - Applied Population and Community Ecology

    (5)
    Principles of population dynamics and ecosystem functioning. Key issues in the study of biodiversity and ecosystems, including functional complementarity, food web stability and complexity, material cycling, and meta-communities. Prerequisite: Admission to BASEC or Department Chair permission.
  
  •  

    ENVC 451 - Independent Study

    (1)
    Special project as approved by instructor and department chair. None
  
  •  

    ENVC 452 - Independent Study

    (2)
    Special project as approved by instructor and department chair. None
  
  •  

    ENVC 453 - Independent Study

    (3)
    Special project as approved by instructor and department chair. None
  
  •  

    ENVC 454 - Independent Study

    (4)
    Special project as approved by instructor and department chair. None
  
  •  

    ENVC 455 - Independent Study

    (5)
    Special project as approved by instructor and department chair. None
  
  •  

    ENVC 499 - Internship

    (3)
    Supervised work experience in the field. Internship positions must include an interview process. Part of the work experience must include a leadership component. Prerequisite: Admission to BASEC or Department Chair permission.
  
  •  

    ENVS 314 - Environmental Science

    (5)
    Natural Sciences
    Investigate how environmental problems have arisen due to human activities (global warming, air pollution, waste disposal) and their impact on corporate practices, including the corporate mission, competitive strategy, technology choices, production development decisions, production processes, and corporate responsibilities. Regulations and permits will be reviewed from the perspective of local planning departments along with sustainability and changes to the environment by using resources at rates that exceed the system’s ability to replenish them. Admission to BASAM program and BASAM Director permission.
  
  •  

    ENVS& 101 - Intro to Env Science

    (5)
    Natural Sciences
    Basic ecology, ecosystems, energy flow, nutrient cycling, population, community dynamics, and the human impact on the environment. Lab included. Prerequisite: Grade of 2.0 or higher in ENGL 097, or AESL 098, or appropriate test score.
  
  •  

    ETHNC 100 - American Minorities: D

    (5)
    Social Sciences
    The culture, contributions and contemporary issues of Asian, Black, Chicano, and Native Americans, with an emphasis on the historical experience and contributions of American minorities. Prerequisite: Appropriate placement or grade of 2.0 or higher in ENGL 099.
  
  •  

    ETHNC 111 - History of the Northwest Indians: D

    (5)
    Social Sciences
    An introduction to the many different indigenous communities inhabiting the Northwest and the significant variety of cultural and environmental experiences and adaptations. Prerequisite: Appropriate placement or grade of 2.0 or higher in ENGL 099.
  
  •  

    ETHNC 201 - Minorities in American Society: D

    (5)
    Social Sciences
    Study of theories used for explaining ethnic minority relations in American society. Includes study of prejudice, discrimination, racism, ethnocentrism, and cultural patterns. Prerequisite: Appropriate placement or grade of 2.0 or higher in ENGL 099.
  
  •  

    ETHNC 299 - Learning into Action

    (1-15)
    Student develops and completes curriculum-related independent project which demonstrates skills and abilities and explores career options. May include, but is not limited to, service learning, original research, and travel abroad. Faculty sponsor approval required. Students with 45 transferable college credits are eligible to begin Learning into Action. None
  
  •  

    FIRE 100 - Principles of Emergency Services

    (5)
    Overview of fire protection and emergency services, career opportunities in fire protection and related fields; culture and history of emergency services; fire loss analysis; organization and function of public and private fire protection services; fire department as part of local government; laws and regulation affecting the fire service; fire service nomenclature; specific fire protection functions; basic fire chemistry and physics; introduction to fire protection systems; introduction to fire strategy & tactics; and life safety initiatives. None
  
  •  

    FIRE 101 - Fire Chemistry

    (3)
    Introduction to basic concepts of chemistry and the chemical/physical nature of fire and its development. None
  
  •  

    FIRE 102 - Emergency Incident Management System

    (3)
    Introduction to Incident Management System and emergency operations. Satisfies training requirements for the National Incident Management System and ICS100/200. None
  
  •  

    FIRE 103 - Building Construction For Fire Protection

    (3)
    Concepts of building construction, structure rating and classification, and uniform codes. Building systems including floors, ceilings, walls, roofs and building support systems. Building collapse and firefighter safety in burning buildings. None
  
  •  

    FIRE 119 - Basic Firefighter Academy

    (8)
    Prepares student for initial assignment as a basic firefighter with a structural fire agency. Meets minimum training requirements of WAC 296-305 and NFPA Standard 1001, Standard for Fire Fighter Professional Qualifications. None
  
  •  

    FIRE 120 - Firefighter Skills I

    (5)
    Introduction to firefighting tools and equipment and basic firefighting techniques. Cognitive and skills development in emergency ground operations using firefighting companies. Focuses on presenting a fire service organizational structure to assist in developing traits that support professional and cultural development. Emphasis on fire ground safety. Meets some of the training requirements for Firefighter 1 certification and incrementally prepares the student for an eventual certification examination. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment required in CSS 103.
  
  •  

    FIRE 121 - Firefighter Skills II

    (5)
    Continuation of FIRE 120. Introduction to firefighting tools and equipment and basic firefighting techniques in new firefighter skill sets. Cognitive and skills development in emergency ground operations using firefighting companies. Emphasizes working in companies. Meets some of the training requirements for Firefighter 1 certification and incrementally prepares the student for an eventual certification examination. Prerequisite: FIRE 120 with minimum C grade or department chair approval.
  
  •  

    FIRE 122 - Firefighter Skills III

    (5)
    Continuation of FIRE 120 and 121. Introduction to firefighting tools and equipment and basic firefighting techniques in new firefighter skill sets. Cognitive and skills development in emergency ground operations using firefighting companies. Emphasizes multi-company operations. Meets some of the training requirements for Firefighter 1 certification and incrementally prepares the student for an eventual certification examination. Prerequisite: FIRE 121 with minimum C grade or department chair approval.
  
  •  

    FIRE 126 - Wildland Firefighting

    (3)
    Firefighters who successfully complete this course will be qualified to suppress wildland fires while under close supervision. Provides required training for all personnel prior to certification as a Firefighter (FFT2) under the Wildland Qualification System (NWCG 310-1). A student who successfully completes the training has a completed Task Book and receives recommendation for certification. None
  
  •  

    FIRE 130 - Emergency Vehicle Driving

    (3)
    Introduction to driving various types of fire apparatus in emergency and non-emergency modes. Meets academic and drill ground training requirements for Washington State Emergency Vehicle Accident Prevention certification. Valid driver’s license required. None
  
  •  

    FIRE 140 - Emergency Medical Responder

    (5)
    Classroom instruction and practical field exercises to prepare students to take the Washington State 60-hour First Responder emergency medical certification test battery. Prerequisite: Department chair approval.
  
  •  

    FIRE 160 - Hazardous Materials First Responder

    (5)
    Prepares firefighters who witness or discover hazardous materials releases to recognize the presence of hazmat, protect themselves, secure the area, initiate emergency response of additional resources, and take defensive actions. Meets the training requirements for Hazardous Materials First Responder Awareness & Operations. Meets the training requirements for Hazardous Materials First ResponderAwareness & Operations Level certification. None
  
  •  

    FIRE 162 - Hazardous Materials Awareness For Public Safety

    (1)
    Provides the basic skills necessary to safely and effectively manage the initial activities of an emergency involving the uncontrolled release of dangerous chemicals. Focuses on responding to and assessing the hazard involved, and making necessary notifications of hazardous material spills. For emergency pre-hospital care personnel, emergency communications officers, law enforcement officers, private industry employees, public works personnel, and Wildland firefighters. None
  
  •  

    FIRE 199 - Fire Service Internship

    (1)
    Relevant work experience through appointment to a fire protection agency. Augments classroom learning by applying skills and knowledge learned and opportunity to develop workplace ethics, appropriate performance levels, and behavioral traits in workplace settings. Prerequisite: Completion of FIRE 122 with minimum C grade or Department Chair approval. Must possess Firefighter 1 and Hazardous Materials First Responder, Operations certifications from the Washington State Fire Marshals Office. Must possess EMT-B certification from National Registry EMT or PE 200.
  
  •  

    FIRE 210 - Fundamentals of Fire Prevention

    (3)
    History and philosophy of fire prevention. Covers fire protection & prevention challenges, public education, laws and codes, and a review of current fire prevention programs. None
  
  •  

    FIRE 211 - Fire Protection Systems

    (3)
    Introduction to the concepts and principles of fire protection systems including fire extinguishers, automatic sprinkler systems, standpipes, fire detection and alarm systems, and special hazard systems. None
  
  •  

    FIRE 212 - Fire Codes & Ordinances

    (3)
    Covers the International Fire Code and certain chapters of the International Building Code. Develop a working knowledge of the Codes and their application to fire inspections. None
  
  •  

    FIRE 223 - Live Fire Operations

    (1)
    Introduction to fire development theory as well as water application principals in order to effectively extinguish interior “”Class A”” fires. Provides the skills necessary to function as the nozzle operator of an interior fire attack team. Also introduces the basic properties of fire- fighting foam and the application methods used to control and combat “Class B” liquid fires. Prerequisite: FIRE 271 or concurrent enrollment.
  
  •  

    FIRE 230 - Fire Service Hydraulics

    (3)
    Introduction to hydraulics as it affects fire stream development and water supply. Includes formula and table calculation of friction loss and engine pressures using hydraulic principles. Covers water main systems, water tender shuttle operations, and fire engine pumping operations. Studies fire pump construction, operation, and techniques of pumping. Pumping evolutions are practiced to become proficient in performing various water supply and attack evolutions. None
  
  •  

    FIRE 240 - Rescue Systems Awareness

    (3)
    Apply search and rescue skills, approach rescue situations safely, and understand the organizational concerns at a structural collapse incident. Provides skill sets that meet or exceed NFPA 1670 at the awareness level for various rescue situations. Prerequisite: None.
  
  •  

    FIRE 241 - Vehicle Extrication

    (3)
    Techniques of rescue company operations to gain entry to damaged vehicles, disentangle and prepare patients for transport, and extricate to safety and care. Includes scene management, heavy rescue apparatus, and equipment and practical applications. None
  
  •  

    FIRE 242 - Basic Emergency Medical Technician

    (12)
    Training for the EMT-Basic level per National Standards Curriculum and abiding by the laws of the Washington State. Learn to recognize, assess and treat medical and trauma related emergencies at the basic life support level. Preparation for National Registry EMT certification testing and includes the National Registry Emergency Medical Technician certification practical examination for EMT-Basic. Prerequisite: In accordance with Washington State law, must be at least 17 years of age at course start.
  
  •  

    FIRE 246 - Wilderness EMT

    (3)
    For EMTs who need to acquire wilderness emergency medical skills and knowledge to be certified as Wilderness EMTs. Learn to provide patient care using improvised equipment. Prerequisite: FIRE 242 or EMT-B certification.
  
  •  

    FIRE 247 - Basic Emergency Medical Technician, Part I

    (6)
    Training for the EMT-Basic level per National Standards Curriculum and abiding by the laws of Washington State. Learn to recognize, assess, and treat medical and trauma-related emergencies at the basic life support level. Preparation for National Registry EMT certification testing. Prerequisite: In accordance with Washington State Law, must be at least 17 years of age at course start.
  
  •  

    FIRE 248 - Basic Emergency Medical Technician, Part II

    (6)
    Training for the EMT-Basic level per National Standards Curriculum and abiding by the laws of Washington State. Learn to recognize, assess, and treat medical and trauma-related emergencies at the basic life support level. Preparation for National Registry EMT certification testing and includes the National Registry Emergency Medical Technician certification practical examination for EMT-Basic. Prerequisite: FIRE 247 with a minimum C grade.
  
  •  

    FIRE 275 - Emergency Service Leadership

    (3)
    Meets training requirements for National Fire Academy, Leadership training series and part of Washington State training requirement for certification as Fire Officer I. For mid-range managers and company officers to enhance critical skills and experience needed to be effective as leaders. None
  
  •  

    FIRE 278 - Managing Company Tactical Operations

    (3)
    Provides a basic foundation for the management of one or more companies operating at a structural fire emergency. Uses simulations to apply concepts and develop skills. Prerequisite: FIRE 102 with minimum C grade or department chair approval.
  
  •  

    FIRE 279 - Fire Services Safety & Survival

    (3)
    Introduction to basic principles and history related to the national firefighter life safety initiatives, focusing on the need for cultural and behavior change throughout the emergency services. None
  
  •  

    FL 131 - Parent Education Co-op, Infants & Toddlers

    (2)
    For parents with infants and toddlers; birth to 36 months. Includes child growth and development, guidance techniques, nutrition, child health and safety, activities for infants and toddlers and parental development. Curriculum may be delivered through weekly home visits and group meetings. None
  
  •  

    FL 132 - Parent Education Cooperative I

    (3)
    For parents with preschool children. Parents will be involved in the operation of the program through parent meetings, committee work, and classroom involvement. None
  
  •  

    FL 133 - Parent Education Cooperative II

    (3)
    For parents of pre-school age children enrolled in a community-based cooperative preschool. Pre-school serves as a lab setting in which parents will observe child development and behavior, positive approaches to guidance and positive adult/child interactions. Parents will participate in assisting the teacher in the classroom, attending monthly parent education sessions, and assistance with a committee job to maintain the lab/school. None
  
  •  

    FL 134 - Parent Education Cooperative III

    (3)
    For parents of preschool age children enrolled in a community-based cooperative preschool. Provides an opportunity for parents to focus on areas of child development and behavior, lab school organizational development, parenting and/or parents as teachers. Student participation includes practicing developmentally appropriate child guidance and positive adult/child activities, assisting the teacher in the classroom, attending monthly parent education sessions, and performing committee or leadership roles to support the lab/school. None
  
  •  

    FL 140 - Parent Education Co-op for Second Parent

    (1)
    For second parent of families in cooperative group of toddlers, three-year olds, four-year olds, and five year olds. Parents will be involved in operation of the program through parent meetings, committee work, or classroom involvement. None
  
  •  

    FRCH 299 - Learning into Action

    (1-15)
    Student develops and completes curriculum-related independent project which demonstrates skills and abilities and explores career options. May include, but is not limited to, service learning, original research, and travel abroad. Faculty sponsor approval required. Students with 45 transferable college credits are eligible to begin Learning into Action. None
  
  •  

    FRCH& 121 - French I: D

    (5)
    Humanities
    A proficiency-based course in French, which includes pronunciation, fundamentals of grammar, syntax, oral and written exercises, reading, and conversation. An appreciation for cultural aspects of France and other French-speaking countries is emphasized. Oral practice is required. Prerequisite: Grade of 2.0 or higher in ENGL 097, or AESL 098, or appropriate test score.
  
  •  

    FRCH& 122 - French II: D

    (5)
    Humanities
    A continuation of French 121: the vocabulary and grammatical structures are more complicated, and the student begins to master other verb tenses and more complex sentence structures. Oral comprehension and speaking skills are emphasized through daily practice, as well as the reading and writing exercises. Prerequisite: FRCH& 121 with a grade of C or better or equivalent French course.
  
  •  

    FRCH& 123 - French III: D

    (5)
    Humanities
    A continuation of French 122: the grammar and vocabulary are more complicated. Oral comprehension and speaking skills are still emphasized through daily oral practice, as well as reading and writing exercises. Pre-requisite: French 122 or equivalent French course. Prerequisite: FRCH& 122 with a grade of C or better or equivalent French course.
  
  •  

    FRCH& 221 - French IV: D

    (5)
    Humanities
    A communication course in beginning intermediate French. Increases proficiency through review and expansion of skills, grammar, and cultural foundation of the language. Emphasizes oral communication. Prerequisite: FRCH& 123 with a grade of C or better or successful completion of two to three years of high school French.
  
  •  

    GEOG 295 - Geography Integrative Experience Seminar

    (2)
    An Integrative Experience emphasizing an interdisciplinary approach to current issues in geography, including the societal context of geography and technology, and/or the ethical, political, and cultural aspects of geography. None
  
  •  

    GEOG 299 - Learning into Action

    (1-15)
    Student develops and completes curriculum-related independent project which demonstrates skills and abilities and explores career options. May include, but is not limited to, service learning, original research, and travel abroad. Faculty sponsor approval required. Students with 45 transferable college credits are eligible to begin Learning into Action. None
 

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